About “Beyond the Rows”

Beyond the Rows is a Monsanto Company blog focused on one of the world’s most important industries, agriculture. Monsanto employees write about Monsanto’s business, the agriculture industry, and the farmer.
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A Perfect Fit: Monsanto’s Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Program and Me Featured Article

By Sarah Battenfield
MBBISP Scholar
Kansas State University

Wheat farming and cattle ranching are my family’s business.  Some of my first memories involve going to our wheat field in Oklahoma and riding the combine with my dad.  From a very early age, I helped my grandmother cook for the harvesters in the field, and as soon as I could reach the pedals, I helped move equipment and operated tractors and combines.

My father wanted me to go to college and pursue any other career because, honestly, farming is hard.  He told me to remember the hard days of manual labor, … Full Article »

Monsanto Fund: Dateline Argentina Featured Article

Generating Entrepreneurial Spirit

Junior Achievement Argentina and Monsanto have been working together since 1998 to generate an entrepreneurial spirit in children and youth that allows them to achieve their goals within a framework of responsibility and freedom.

In 2006, this relationship grew when Monsanto decided to work with Junior Achievement Argentina to develop a new program focused on rural enterprises. The result was the creation of Our Field (Nuestro Campo in Spanish), a six-session program designed for students aged 13 to 15.

In the Our Field program, students learn the importance of education for their future and the role of … Full Article »

golden sun wheat

On Breeding Wheat Featured Article

Bharath K. Reddy is a recipient of a Monsanto Beachell-Borlaug International Scholarship. Last week, the Times of India posted an article in which he describes the scholarship program and what his particular research program is about.

“Wheat is one of the major staple food crops in many parts of the world with constant biotic and abiotic stresses,” he says. “Incidence of crop and pest diseases along with heat and drought result in significant reduction in grain yields. Scientists across the world are relentlessly trying to improve wheat cultivars with higher yields and better resistance a broad range of genetic … Full Article »