About “Beyond the Rows”

Beyond the Rows is a Monsanto Company blog focused on one of the world’s most important industries, agriculture. Monsanto employees write about Monsanto’s business, the agriculture industry, and the farmer.
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A Future Opportunity for Bee Health Featured Article

By Dr. Gregory Heck
Monsanto Company
For Bee Culture Magazine

Monsanto’s Dr. Greg Heck recently wrote an article for Bee Culture Magazine on a future opportunity in bee health – RNAi and what it could mean as a great addition to the toolbox of agricultural solutions.

“RNAi is used by plants, animals and fungi to read the information stored in their DNA and use it to develop actual physical characteristics, called ‘traits,’ he writes. “Our early farmer ancestors saw some of these traits as valuable and bred plants for those desirable qualities – without knowing, needless to say, that RNAi … Full Article »

honey bee on flower

The Promise of Science for Improving Honey Bee Health Featured Article

By Alex Inberg
Varroa Project Lead, Monsanto

As I read daily media articles about honey bee health and the importance of honey bees as pollinators to our food supply and the environment, I feel compelled to offer my perspective as a scientist working on finding a solution to improve the health of honey bees. While many explanations for the widely-debated phenomenon of colony collapse have been circulated, to this date, scientists can agree only on the fact that multiple factors contribute to honey bee demise.

Since 2009, I have been involved in research to develop products based on RNA interference … Full Article »

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Science and Repeatability: A Case in Point Featured Article

By Jay Petrick, Ph.D., DABT*
Senior Toxiciologist

The laws of nature are pretty consistent. If I heat a pot of water to 212 degrees over and over and over again, it starts to boil every single time. That makes me confident in saying water boils at 212 degrees.

But what if one of my neighbors says he got water to boil at 180 degrees, and no one else in the neighborhood can recreate the result in their own kitchen? It’s more likely his thermometer is broken than he’s discovered something new about the boiling point of water.

That’s why repeatability … Full Article »