About “Beyond the Rows”

Beyond the Rows is a Monsanto Company blog focused on one of the world’s most important industries, agriculture. Monsanto employees write about Monsanto’s business, the agriculture industry, and the farmer.
[x] close

What does carbon neutral mean? A Q&A with an expert

Mike Lohuis is the Ag Environmental Strategy Lead at Monsanto, and is helping develop our strategy to address climate change. Here he answers some questions about our commitment to carbon neutrality.

What is Carbon Neutral Crop Production, and why is it important?

Crops use the process of photosynthesis to naturally convert carbon-dioxide from the atmosphere into oxygen and organic carbon in the form of plant biomass, roots and grain. However, the use of tillage, fuel, fertilizer, manure and other inputs used to grow crops also release carbon-dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHG) back into the atmosphere. Carbon-neutral cropping is a … Full Article »

2013 GAP Report: The Sub-Saharan Africa Challenge Featured Article

By Dr. Margaret Zeigler
Global Harvest Initiative 

Today, October 16, the Global Harvest Initiative released our 2013 GAP Report® at the World Food Prize in Des Moines, Iowa. The African presence at the World Food Prize is always significant. Dignitaries, farmers, agricultural experts, and international development professionals, among many others, travel to Des Moines from far and wide to learn and to meet new people that share their vision to improve global food and nutrition security.

It is always great to be a part of the World Food Prize and to experience first-hand the collective power of people … Full Article »

Canadian Canola: Innovation + Investment = Gains Featured Article

The story of canola production in Canada is a great example of how private industry investment in breeding and biotechnology, coupled with an industry wide focus on improved agronomic practices, can lead to enhanced farm profitability generated by increased yields.

Canola is a “made–in-Canada” success story.  Canola was originally called rapeseed and was produced for the industrial lubricant market from the 1940s to 1960s.  In the 1960s, public sector Canadian scientists modified the oil profile to produce “double low rapeseed.” The name of the modified grain in Canada was formally changed to “canola” in 1974.

During these years, the yield … Full Article »