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I am a Monsanto Collaborator

Featured Article

By Jesus Madrazo
Vice President, Corporate Engagement

The world faces a lot of big challenges today – climate change, feeding another 2 billion people in the next three decades, and protecting the environment are just a few. Solving those big problems will require debate, dialogue, diversity of opinion and lots of people working together. Reasonable people can and should disagree about how to solve those problems – that’s healthy.

But there’s a big difference between healthy debate and demonizing people you disagree with.  Personal attacks don’t move any of us closer to solutions.  To the contrary, those attacks make it harder to work together to find real, practical solutions.

A recent article on the website Natural News is an example of how personal attacks can distract from productive conversation.

The author of this article equated Monsanto’s employees with Nazis, and likened those who work with us — or even report on what we do — to “Nazi collaborators.” He even illustrated his article with several extremely graphic images of Holocaust victims.

He then wrote “all Monsanto collaborators need to be documented now, with their names, photos, public statements and other details that might someday make tracking them down easier.”  He argued that “humanity must record and remember those who collaborated with the enemy.” A couple of days later someone put up a web site that named people as Monsanto “collaborators.”

This sort of story is profoundly and deeply offensive to the memory of Nazi victims, who faced horror and suffering beyond imagining. It is also insulting and threatening to the people (scientists, reporters and others) the writer calls “Monsanto propaganda collaborators” and accuses of having promoted “mass genocide.” I also am troubled to see someone verbally attack Monsanto employees – great people who work hard every day to contribute to solutions to help feed a growing world – in such a personal, hateful way. They don’t deserve to be the targets of this sort of attack.

Plain and simple, this is an attempt to use hate-filled intimidation to silence those with opposing viewpoints.

At Monsanto, we know people aren’t always going to see eye-to-eye on these important issues and understand that helping solve some of the world’s biggest challenges takes broad collaboration, including by people who have some pretty tough criticisms of us. We encourage vigorous debate. We just hope that debate will be full of facts, not personal attacks.

We know these particular posts represent a very small number of extreme critics. But, sometimes the most extreme voices can be the loudest. The Organic Consumers Association (OCA), one of the leading advocacy groups that opposes GMO crops, regularly publishes information from the author of this piece, including as recently as three months ago. The author even appeared as a guest on the nationally syndicated Dr. Oz Show less than four months ago. I am not suggesting that Dr. Oz, the OCA, or others who work with this author share his views. But I do hope they’ll condemn rhetoric like this and support a more positive conversation about how to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

To all of our employees and others with whom we work and collaborate, thank you for your patience and persistence in focusing on solutions, not sound bites.  I am proud to be associated with each of you – even if we disagree – and I am proud to be a Monsanto “collaborator.”

Related:

Discover Magazine: “Mike Adams, Monsanto, Nazis, and a Very Disturbing Article

78 Responses to "I am a Monsanto Collaborator"

  1. Right on Jesus! Well put.

    As for this idea of the debate between organics and GMOs being “full of facts, not personal attacks,” I’m afraid we’re well beyond that now. Yes, everything WE write will remain, as it always has, fact based. But the anti-GMO organic movement knows full well the facts are not on their side. So they really have no choice but to stoop to personal attacks, at least as long as they insist on carrying on this manufactured debate.

    What I suggest you do, as an executive at Monsanto, is to never engage with a member of the anti-GMO organic movement unless they first concede that genetic engineering is a completely legitimate field of science. And you need to get every executive at Monsanto, Bayer, Syngenta, etc., to do the same.

    After that, organic activists are certainly welcome to debate the merits of GMO crops and argue whether or not companies like yours should be able to hold patents on GMO seed varieties. But they must first admit that there is nothing inherently wrong with genetic engineering. And if they don’t, then they must be ignored.

    So please make this the first day that you stop talking about “coexistence” between organic and GMO farming. They have coexisted just fine for over 20 years now. And please don’t attend another AC21 meeting in Washington, even if the President himself invites you. And please, PLEASE, try being just a little bit more aggressive when confronting the leadership of the organic movement or sympathetic members of the media who have now made it their mission to ban the science of genetic engineering from agriculture.

    Make no mistake Jesus, this whole “Monsanto Collaborator” fiasco did not arise because we were ever too aggressive. It reared its ugly head because we were too passive… far too passive, and often conciliatory.

    Appeasement never works, especially when it comes to science. You’re not only a captain of industry; you’re also a representative of an intellectual endeavor that began over 13,000 years ago when humankind first began farming and hence began manipulating the planet’s environment to suit its needs. Never apologize for that.

    Be proud of what you do Jesus, and stand tall. In fact, it would be nice if you wrote articles like this all the time, not just when some radical extremists threaten those of us who stand in support of GMOs with violence and death.

    Don’t ever stop aggressively and proudly defending GMOs. You’re welcome to water down your company’s business model if you wish. But never, ever water down the science.

    God’s speed Jesus. and thanks for writing this article.

    Reply
    • Jesus try’s but surrenders almost immediately. Climate change a problem we are facing today? Humans have always struggled against climate change from the dawn of man. Diversity of opinion? Diversity of informed opinion. Otherwise The word diversity only has a political context. When you mix politics with science you get a lot more politics than science in the end. These terrorists have been at this a while and you folks just kept trying to make nice. Now you are in danger. Stop with the ‘diversity’ and climate change B.S. Stick to the science and tell the moonbats to decrease their own contribution to their manufactured problems by decreasing the surplus population of moonbats. In other words it’s to late for anything other than fighting fire with fire.

      Reply
      • In addition I choose not to purchase gm products if I can avoid them but thank goodness they are available for the worlds burgeoning population made available by talented and concerned scientists because the moonbats can’t even grow enough food to sustain one isle a Trader Joes.

        Reply
    • hybridization, selective breeding are TOTALLY DIFFERENT than gene splicing and for you to infer they are equal in scope of biological manipulation shows your level of ignorance of the field. If GMO foods are so fine so healthy such a benign source of proteins and carbohydrates then why is it that such a large percentage of wealthy eat ORGANIC foods and eschew such foods as produced by the skills of microbiologists in the labs of Monsanto Kerr McGee and Beatrice Inc? Could it be they are avoiding such molecular tampering in their diet because it is truly unknown just what the long term effects may be? I think that is a likely explanation. Further the sudden increase in instances of deaths of bee populations and bird populations from so many different areas but all of which are highly agricultural AND areas in which the cultivation of GMO crops has been introduced in just the last 5 years, leads one to believe that the GMOs are not very healthy for the planet at large.
      I have no problem debating the topic I have no problem conceding if but only if I am show convincing proof of the veracity of the evidence to support the benefits of GMO crops. As for demonizing employees of Monsanto I think that a bit childish to even suggest that is a widely held belief. But when Monsanto sues farmers because the seeds are owned by Monsanto that makes one believe Monsanto has some very dark future in store for us all. Monsanto as a multi-national corporation has no loyalty has no concern and has no patriotism for anything nor anyone the sole concern for Monsanto is PROFIT and that to me is as alien to the safety of the human race as the void of space. I do not trust them and they do nothing to engender a belief in me that they are to be trusted.

      Reply
      • Amen brother. Would you really trust to put anything in your body made by the corporation that brought you Agent Orange. I agree that most wealthy and affluent areas have access to organic non GMO foods and markets such as Trader Joes and Whole Foods for a reason because they are educated. If the GMO crops can withstand and kill pests with certain proteins is it really all that safe in the human body. Who knows? Monsanto is running a live Frankenstein experiment and unfortunately the test subject are the poor and impoverished who have to resort to eating the frozen garbage fed to them by companies like ConAgra and Cargill who are well subsidized by crops from Monsanto. Its time most people pull the veil that is covering their faces and demand food labeling.

        Reply
        • There were 17 companies contracted by the federal government to produce agent orange, and they all did it according to the specs provided by the department of defense. To link Monsanto to the problems with agent orange is just false and misleading. The herbicides in agent orange were already on the market and approved for use in the USA for many years before they were applied to the jungles of Vietnam.

          Reply
      • Perhaps someone could genetically modify a comma for your post. They do make reading that much easier. Your post is full of supposition and conjecture, no facts. Finally, rich people buy organic foods because it is more expensive (to prove a point), and shopping at Whole (paycheck) Foods is “cool”.

        Reply
      • Both sides of this issue have engaged in this sort of thing. In the run-up to the election for California’s Prop 37 to require labeling of GMOs, the anti-37 money put on an ad with a Stanford professor who disgraced himself by stating there was no difference between GMOs and grafting fruit trees on to root stock. Simply outrageous. But they did manage to beat down the proposition. Who is afraid of labeling? BTW there are several reputable MDs currently presenting their dietary programs on PBS (Drs. Hyman, Amen, Fuhrman, and Perlmutter) who think the GMO corn products are punching holes in people’s intestines thus provoking “leaky gut syndrome”. (The mechanism by which the “BT corn” kills the bugs in by exploding their GI tract.)

        Reply
    • Well put article, Jeeze, but let a poor ignorant, uneducated peon (pee-on) put forth a humble, but extremely ominous question that you should be able to answer with equal ‘eloquence’, just so that ‘No truth shall be left behind’?

      What about Monsanto’s role in funding and expanding the Toxic high altitude chemical trail weather control/HAARP experiments all these years and then giving control of it to the military when the light of truth, like sunshine breaking through the artificially created poisonous weather clouds, revealed the atrocity, so Monsanto could escape liability similar to the 90 million they just settled out in SC, I believe’ for poisoning their environment with Agent Orange type chemicals?!

      Is all that just urban myth and conspiracy theories?

      Reply
      • We’re not exactly sure who started the chemtrails myth, but there’s absolutely no truth to it. We did not fund weather experiments. And it continues to amaze us that people will believe this nonsense.

        Reply
        • It,s all about profit and population control ! GMO,s make you infirtil ,give you cancer !!! If your well off enough to afford organic and do so. well Monsanto has that figured out that too we,ll just make the crap in the CHEMICAL TRAILS being spryed world wide to kill us all off !!! monsonto if your frankinfood is so great how come its banned in other country,s @ the world Heck even the poorest countrys wont eat your GMO crap ???? There is more than enough space to grow food enough to feed the whole world so dn,t give me that crap that we,re running out of space (Thats called the Federal Land Grab operation ) keep out the american people and force them back into the citys we,re they can be controled by the goverment ! Oh and if your GMO crap is no diffrent than GODS seeds then why do you need a patent ? Also why do you hear about Monsonta always suing organic farmers and shutting them down afraid people might get healthy and live longer and have childeren ??? You creeps need to crawl back under the rock you slithered out from under we the People don,t want your frankinfood Crap please just go away I Pray everyday that God will shut you down and expose you for the liers you truly ARE!!!!!!!!

          Reply
          • GMOS do not cause cancer. ChemTrails is a complete myth. GM seed is banned in only one country – Peru. There’s not enough space to grow all the food the world needs and will need with massive environmental destruction. Monsanto has never sued an organic farmer, and we have never sued anyone for accidental pollination.

          • You are truly a real person with real concerns. Thank you for being honest, frank and ingenuous. I am often amazed at the morons that protect the very entity that is holding them down. Like the kidnap victims I see the Stockholm syndrome is likely the cause. No other rational reason could cause a person to want to kill his own family and world. As for the profiteers, they are just plain evil. Where politics and profits meet, you will find fascism. Enough Said, I think the truth is evident if you have the facts. Amazing how the twisted arguments and flat out denials are the some how effective on the ignorant haters.

    • Bravo! Well said. Professional and intelligent and oh so true. Keep fighting, Monsanto! Sing loudly and proudly your solutions for our future world growth!

      Reply
    • I understand the vividly passionate on both ends, you may see no harm and they will see the opposite.
      But I ask, why is data being hidden? Instead of letting it speak for itself. Why is it that almost every other country has research, and that alone is enough to BAN gmo not just mandatory labeling if you want the people to listen you need to tell the truth, this is food not politics. we are Americans after all a lot of people don’t like us…. Or anyone… But that is a whole other issue.

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  2. This type of rhetoric has been building for a while and this is just the most high profile incident to receive wider attention. Though it’s coming from a fringe of the anti-GMO movement, it was a contributing factor in my departure from that cause.

    I described this in an essay I wrote about the 2013 March Against Monsanto in Santa Fe:

    “I’m concerned about the escalation of violent rhetoric against Monsanto employees and that was a reason not to go to the march. I see comments posted on Facebook that call for violence (up to execution) of Monsanto executives and scientists. Things are getting out of hand and I fear the proliferation of misinformation is going to result in violence….

    I have no doubt that the employees of Monsanto generally believe they’re doing good work that promotes sustainable agriculture. Whether those beliefs (and the PR on their web site) actually match the results of use of their products in the real world is outside the scope of this post. I mention it mainly because I feel the need to speak against the demonization of Monsanto employees (sometimes literally demonized as “minions of MonSATAN”).”

    Via http://realfoodorg.wordpress.com/2014/04/04/my-mind-is-a-work-in-progress/

    The vast majority of opponents of agricultural biotechnology don’t condone violence, but their movement will suffer if they don’t clearly disassociate themselves. This is a watershed moment for the anti-GMO cause.

    By expressing any sympathy for the people targeted by the violent rhetoric, I’ve become a collaborator too.

    The clearest action that anti-GMO activists can take is to declare their own collaboration. They need not embrace biotechnology to do this, but simply pledge to collaborate as fellow human beings in repudiating calls to violence.

    Reply
  3. The anti GMO activists have no valid scientific credence to substantiate their unfounded allegations. They forget for a moment that the scope of this science extends beyond Monsanto. These vested interest activists with the prime object of opposing Monsanto spread false hood and prevent the benefits reaching the farmers. Threatening the people who support the technology is simply the out come of Mike Adam’s frustration.

    Reply
      • Yes they do. Plenty of toxicology studies as well as 20 years of use without one documented case of illness or injury connected to a gmo product. If you can show me one case of injury or illness from gmo I would like to see it, from a credible source that has gone through scientific review.

        Reply
        • I think all the companies that produce GMO products should have to fund a non governmental body that only looks for the negative effects of GMO’s. The science that is true today isn’t necessarily true tomorrow. everyday we are learning about things that were supposed to be good are actually bad and vice versus. I believe we all want to feed the worlds growing population but we also know profits are the true motivator not benevolence. Am i correct that the EU doesn’t allow GMO crops? I’m not a scientist but when I see a tomato the size of a melon, or a chicken breast the size of a turkey breast my mind tells me that isn’t natural and my body says think twice.

          Reply
          • dave,

            The literal Truth of something doesn’t change, but our understanding sometimes does, and often for subtle reasons.

            Most of our domesticated crops and animals are very different from their wild ancestors and often from their predecessors in living memory, and yes, this is due to genetic modification, mostly by manipulating the prevalences of specific alleles and combinations through selective breeding and hybridization to introduce new ones, along with a few mutations here-and-there. That’s been going-on for at least six thousand years. Since the changes to an organism’s genome made by this process are orders-of-magnitude more complex, unpredictable and uncontrolled compared to the recently-developed more precise methods, we should definitely make sure the safety of every “cross” is tested, ESPECIALLY the ones where the source of half the genes is unknown, uncontrolled, undocumanted and potentially unsafe, the so-called “Open Pollinated” breeding method.

  4. I want to be one of the (possible) rare ones who says, “Thank you guys for all you do. It’s a hard job, but you’re helping to make the world a better place. That’s not something many get to do.

    But, I request you guys take this threat seriously, and may be help report him to the FBI, and DHS. We must show people like this their threats will not be tolerated.

    Reply
  5. I buy GM corn, so I guess I’m providing financial support. Come and get me, Mike Adams and the “other” guy who made the nazi website. Come and get me you little punk-lip cowards.

    Reply
    • Corn has been genetically modified for decades . As far as I know that was to get better yields, better tastes, higher sugars , more kernels per cob, etc.
      I personally don’t think corn has been modified very long so that chemicals in the corn resist insects, blights, rusts, etc.

      35 years ago , I helped the Forest Service introduce a chemical called Furidan into pine seed orchards in the south. Most of the seeds in each pine cone were being rendered useless by an insect. The idea was to get the roots to uptake the chemical, and ultimately have an amount of it grow into the pinecones, so bugs wouldn’t eat it. The operative word here is “Bugs” Humans don’t normally eat the seeds of pine cones grown in pine orchards. I was sent elsewhere before the conclusion of the study. The material was a purple stuff coated onto sand. Within an hour of application, songbirds were dying, that either tried eating the stuff, or getting the sand for their gizzards. The birds lasted about 10 minutes after ingesting the stuff. They didn’t flop around on the ground, but fell from the trees dead. The insecticide would dissipate after a rain, or if the ground was sprayed. We applied it with protective suits and masks.
      I personally think big chemical companies should disclose ALL the information about how and why crops were altered decades ago, and disclose ALL of what’s going on today. I think there are two different reasons. George Washington Carver, a black guy, genetically altered soybeans to get new varieties that were more drouth resistant, or heat resistant, or higher yields. His experiments did not include adding chemicals to kill bugs. Let’s be perfectly honest about what we are doing.
      I can’t forget that Thalidomide was once marketed to pregnant women for morning sickness. I personally know a man that is the result of that. He has one good, useful arm and hand. On the other side a full sized useless hand sticks out of his shoulder . It flops around as he walks. Manages a grocery store.
      Today Thalidomide is still available under other names. We kill cancers in adults with it.
      Have a good day.

      Reply
      • Corn naturally produces a compound known as DIMBOA that keeps certain insects from eating it. Look it up. Where are all of the Anti DIMBOA critics. Bt proteins are made from soil microorganisms, and Bt toxins are approved for organic use and sprayed directly on many crops for nearly 100 years. Because Monsanto figured out a way for corn to produce bt toxin vs. making it a factory really does not really change the nature of the Bt toxins. They are very specific to certain insects and have no effects on mammals.

        Reply
      • I remember Thalidomide. I checked some MSDS sheets connected with certain chemicals recently. Years ago… they didn’t have the following disclaimer.. which is now at the very bottom of the multi-page document (MSDS) that users and consumers are supposed to read as-per Fed/EPA regs. ( but of course that requires extra education and training ( I was HAZMAT qualified) the disclaimer now reads.. the user/comsumer is responsible for knowing health dangers and taking appropriate safety measures. XXX ( short for whoever produces the item) bears no responsibility for damages to health.. etc etc.. you get my drift. I live in an area which gets ‘saturated’ with Roundup and mosquito killer chemicals etc etc ( you get my drift.) Now last time I checked…animals haven’t learned to read MSDS sheets … yet… that may be coming in the future to a genetically modified neighborhood near you. I love this thread.

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  6. I guess I am considered a Monsanto collaborator and am at risk of violence from these people. I choose to support and speak out for the farmers like my dad and brother, who’s farm has been saved by biotechnology here in Hawaii. The truth will prevail and I will continue to speak out for it!

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  7. I am constantly overhearing negative comments (from the same group of people) regarding Monsanto. I am not political, but if I must label myself, I choose “Humanitarian”. When I ask the “negative Nancy’s” how they would suggest going about feeding the growing population, none of them respond (with anything intelligent)! I find myself explaining repeatedly how irresponsible practices “yesterday” have put us in dire straights “today”…we need to rely on innovative solutions from organizations such as Monsanto if we ever hope to see “tomorrow”. Our founding forefathers broke it…Monsanto is simply trying to fix it…nothing more, nothing less! I guess I am a Monsanto Collaborator…sign me up!!!

    Reply
    • Do you really think genetically engineering plants to accept saturation of Round Up is the only way? I find it hard to believe.

      Reply
    • Good post. Also ask them how they would control corn rootworm, European corn borer and corn earworm. Before bt corn we were spraying them with multiple applications of synthetic insecticides. So gmo have displaced the application of millions of pounds of insecticide applied into the environment. How can you possibly argue that is not a better way to produce food on the farm. The haters of Monsanto most likely have no investment in agriculture and are not depending on a profitable crop to feed their families and do it in a way with the least potential for negative impact on the environment.

      Reply
  8. That’s a very sick man. And what an insult to my father who worked for nearly 35 years for this great company. He sounds likes those people that used to ask their fellow citizens in former GDR (Eastern Germany) to denounce each other…

    Reply
  9. Thanks for addressing the hate mongering article. I hope OCA & Dr. Oz take note and disassociate from Natural News.

    People always look ate funny when i say there is a huge demand for GMO. Look at the trend of the adoption curve. If it is all upward trending it either says the technogy is successful and the product is good quality or it says we farmers are stupid. Ummmm…

    Reply
  10. Being Jewish, a Monsanto employee and a farmer I felt that the Mike Adams hit me with 3 strikes. It is actually sad to think about the groups of people that are affected by his comments. Biotech is the maybe one of the most disruptive technologies being developed right now and therefore fruitful in terms of discussion. As a Jew, Monsanto employee and a farmer I can only embrace, encourage and defend the argumentation but messages that are full of hate, misinformation and prejudice such as this are at most object of pity.

    Reply
  11. Hi Jesus,

    What do you have to say about the 250,000 farmers who were driven to suicide by Monsanto? If you are that great a Company, why should you threaten and blackmail/bribe developing and poor countries’ governments so they would let you stay? GET OUT OF INDIA. You are ruining our agriculture.

    Reply
    • Check your facts – you’re citing out of date studies.

      90% of Indian farmers have adopted GM technology. Multiple studies point to significant reduction in pesticide spraying and subsequent cost savings for cotton farmers.

      In 2012, the country harvested 5.1 million tons of cotton per year, which is well above the 3 million tons before Bt cotton, making India the world’s second-largest cotton producer.

      So apparently, Indian farmers have overwhelmingly embraced GM cotton – the belief that Bt cotton has failed is a disproved myth.

      The main reason behind the increased Indian suicides has more to do with the banking reform, which made banking competitive, and subsequently led to fewer loans to agriculture and farmers.

      Reply
  12. Sounds like a bunch of PC brainwashing to me… Ask yourself this one vital question and it will lead you to the truth.. If GMOs are harmless , why are they fighting to prevent labeling???????
    If their products are so good for everyone and the environment, why wouldn’t they desire to have their product proudly labeled?????
    The bottom line is, there is scientific proof that these imitation food products cause cancer and a whole variety of serious health problems. Wake up Sheeple!!

    Reply
  13. Personal attacks are usually counterproductive. If you are going to attack someone verbally have a specific reason to – and elucidate that reason in a reasonable and calm manner.

    However, concerning Monsanto’s GMO promises; higher yield, lower cost, limited herbicide usage, etc, they have failed miserably. Just ask the farmers in India (those who are still alive that is)

    Monsanto, you have wonderful and dedicated employees yet have dug yourself a hole of untruths and blind dogma that you will have a difficult time gaining the trust of an increasingly informed public.. Trust your employees to find a way to correct these deficiencies. You do not have to do a giant “mea culpa” just admit your mistakes and move on with corrective action. The public will accept sincere effort to benefit the masses.

    Food production in the US is not at issue. We tend to throw away as much as we eat (another topic worthy of discussion – but not here).

    Help those who truly need the technology to feed their citizens. We are not that far from a global food crisis.

    Make a sincere effort to help us as a human race – not as a bottom line for your stockholders.

    Reply
    • Failed miserably? You obviously have no knowledge of market share in the crop production industry. Glyphosate tolerant crops are grown on nearly every acre of corn and soybean, and bt traits are planted on a very high percentage of corn acres. These technologies have been rapidly adopted by farmers around the globe, yields have gone up, application of pesticides has gone down and we are much better off now than what we were doing before these technologies from an environmental standpoint. Could you perhaps elaborate on how they have been a failure?

      Reply
  14. It s so sad to see people believe that Monsato is really trying to “poison us” and for some reason they don’t understand that if that were the case, the short term economic gain would not be worth killing all of the consumers and not having anyone left to buy your product.. ha all jokes aside, I do hope people wake up.

    Reply
    • I suspect Monsanto has its fingers in many pies and doesn’t much care what the after effects of their products may be. When they stop fighting so vehemently the labeling of GMOs, I might consider that they have less than nefarious motivations.

      Reply
    • It wont kill you right away its a slow death exactly as planned make more money that way !!!!!!and thier will always be plenty of uninformed people to take the place of those passing unfortunatly!!! If its great LABEL IT and Back up how Great it truly is !!! THe truth is if you labeled right now today Monsanto would be out of business by the end of the Year 2014 because then we,d all know what not to eat!!!

      Reply
  15. If this statement is truly true, “We encourage vigorous debate. We just hope that debate will be full of facts,”, then why is your company so against allowing people to know the real facts about what we are putting into our bodies? Such as “labeling”…

    Why does your company and so many others spend so much money to defeat initiatives to require labeling of GM products, just as every other ingredient in our food is required to be labeled?

    If this is so safe, then be proud of what you do, instead of attempting to sneak it into our diets, to sneak it into areas where the wind will blow your altered pollen into neighboring farmer’s fields… the ones who choose (and at times very strongly) to not be growing GM foods, then put a label on it, put signs up around fields that are growing your product.

    Or is it that you are afraid that people will choose wisely? To choose to not ingest products who’s safety remains yet to be seen?

    We pro-labeling people just want the facts when we shop.

    Why do you continue to attempt to suppress those facts?

    Reply
  16. I do not hold with verbal attacks on people, but I would like to point out a few facts. 1) Monsanto has sued hundreds of farmers. That is not very nice either. One case in particular in Canada they sued a farmer whose crop had been polluted with GMO pollen claiming he was violating their patent. 2) Monsanto has poured millions of dollars to fight campaigns to get GMO foods labelled. If they are ‘safe’ and equivalent then label them with pride. 3) GMO crops have built in resistance to herbicides and require heavy spraying of herbicides, which are polluting streams, rivers and oceans. 4) Monsanto is creating breeds of plants whose seeds are sterile. There business plan is to lease seeds to farmers. Long term this will cause everyone who wants to grow their crops to have to lease the seeds from Monsanto. 5) GMO is not the same as hybridization 6) I doubt this post will get posted here….

    Reply
    • There have been approximately 170 lawsuits over 20 years; for context, we have 250,000 customers. The case you cite in Canada had nothing to do with accidental pollination. The farmer was found guilty by three different Canadian courts.

      Reply
      • Monsantoco
        September 5, 2014 at 1:57 pm

        GMOS do not cause cancer. ChemTrails is a complete myth. GM seed is banned in only one country – Peru. There’s not enough space to grow all the food the world needs and will need with massive environmental destruction. Monsanto has never sued an organic farmer, and we have never sued anyone for accidental pollination.

        So first you haven’t sued farmers, now there’s been 170 lawsuits in 20 years! Also, a couple months ago there was on the local news in Maine, a story of a farming family being sued by Monsanto. They would likely lose their farm as they couldn’t afford the legal fees. I do not remember every detail of the story, just who & why they were probably losing the farm!!

        Reply
    • Peggi, if you came up with an invention, invested your own dollars in developing it and obtaining a patent on it, would you let other people steal it? The only reason monsanto has used farmers is because they had credible evidence that they stole the technology and used it in violation of the agreement they signed with Monsanto. Don’t believe the nonsense you read that Monsanto sued guys who had pollen drift onto their farm. All these cases are in soybean. Soybean are self pollinated and the pollen does not drift. When a guys has an entire field of roundup ready soybean but no proof that he purchased the seed, the only conclusion is theft of technology. Monsanto is not evil for enforcing their patent, you would do the same thing if it was your invention.

      Reply
    • Fiction on second article as well. There has never been a documented case of gmo causing injury. All pest control technologies naturally select for members of the insect or weed population that are naturally resistant to the control measure. Since they are the ones that survive and reproduce, the population shifts in the direction if individuals that possess resistance. It happens with every pest control technology, they don’t become superbugs or super weeds, just resistant to a specific control technique. As an industry we then shift control tactics to stay ahead. Been going on since we first started cultivating crops.

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  17. Once I read “The world faces a lot of big challenges today – climate change…” that was it. I knew I couldn’t believe anything after that. Anyone with half a brain knows that there really is no such thing as climate change. It’s just political deception to gain power and wealth. Just look at Al Gore – you need look no further.

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  18. Jesus Madrazo wrote, “We encourage vigorous debate.”

    You may encourage it, but you don’t participate in it.

    “We just hope that debate will be full of facts, not personal attacks.”

    Likewise, we hope your company won’t make attacks on the environment and on our health, which is a helluva lot more important than the name calling you have to endure.

    I’m not stupid. I have a degree in science. I’ve worked as a wildlife biologist. I’m politically active, having run for public office – and I’m an expert on propaganda. I also know how to connect the dots.

    Your company, Monsanto, gave the world DDT and Agent Orange, among other things. I love the argument used against the Vietnamese who wanted to sue the U.S. for the nightmarish suffering dumped on them in the form of Agent Orange: “We thought it would just defoliate the trees. We didn’t know it would do any other damage.” (I’m paraphrasing.”

    What stupidity.

    And I recently read about the GMO super banana that was tested…by feeding it to Mongolian gerbils?!! After passing that test, it was to be tested on human subjects for a few weeks. How is a few weeks of testing supposed to tell us how these bananas might affect us twenty years from now? How will they affect the unborn, or the environment?

    That super banana, by the way, was plugged by Bill Gates. I know Gates very well. Did I mention the fact that I used to be a teacher? I can tell you about all the good things Bill “Blabbermouth Express” Gates did for Seattle’s public schools – NOT.

    I can also tell you about the tax-subsidized Gates Foundation, which is a monumental joke.

    I could go on and on and on. Suffice it to say that I’ve got your number, pal, and I have no problem with people comparing you to the Nazis.

    Reply
    • Monsanto did not invent DDT. The company licensed it for a couple of years in the 1940s and then discontinued the business. The company also did not invent Agent Orange. The US government required several companies to manufacture it, and the government handled all spraying of it in Vietnam. It was used primarily to defoliate jungle areas where enemy soldiers would hide. And the use of the product saved American and allied lives.

      Reply
  19. … the Monsanto employee’s response condemns bad manners, but not a peep about the real and scary risks genetic modification poses long term. I love pandas, hate nazis, and am concerned that monsanto is trying to brand itself as a would be savior to the planet’s ills…. monsanto is not responsible for all misfortunes, but seems ethically challenged, and morally flabby, and is developing a strange seige mentality. The captains of that industry ought to do some serious soul searching. good luck.

    Reply
  20. I grow Monsanto “Roundup Ready” corn every year, and have for many years. Great corn for my cattle, less diesel fuel used, and cuts my labor cost to virtually nothing. As a farmer, I just don’t see the problem. Great yield. Great quality. If any of these idiots that have a problem with the product want to do some REALLY hard work, maybe I’ll grow something else if they will hoe it by hand for me dirt cheap. That way they can join the third world they worry so much about.

    Reply
    • Doug Cole,
      Monsanto “Roundup Ready” corn is a great product, it works as advertised or so I’ve heard, but if a large wind blew your seeds into a neighbors field, they could find themselves in court facing Monsanto, and some of the best lawyers money can buy, it’s happened before… how many small farmers can “afford justice”?
      Monsanto is known for being unreasonable and “taking no prisoners”, that treatment should only be reserved for repeat offenders and those blatantly ignoring patent laws.

      Reply
  21. I merely want my foods labeled so I can do my own field testing with my own blood sugar reads. I knew before the studies came out to support my findings that beef and pork aren’t good for diabetics because of the sustained blood sugar spikes after eating these meats even though the rest of the meal was comprised of foods I’d already tested. Why Monsanto continues to work to block the labeling of its wares, I do not know. I am diabetic, I need to test for myself. I found out what high fructose corn syrup does, and helped to spread the word…the companies have changed their ways or lost money…is this what Monsanto fears? Is it their grains that are helping to increase diabetes world wide? Do they fear the blood test?

    Reply
      • Monsantoco -I see both sides but Monsantoco should stop lying about suing people- you are shameless in this regard and you did/do sue farmers who were ‘accidently” – cross pollinated- stop lying/parsing words about that- that is why the nut bags won’t give your data any consideration. and employees be careful about what you STAND behind -that is exactly why the crazies are holding you PERSONALLY accountable for all the rotten that Monsanto does- you can’t have it both ways

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  22. I have no problem with GMO crops, I understand the need to better crops to help feed the growing world population. The problem I do have, is those 170 lawsuits( I do believe some were justified ), and things like the Monsanto Protection Act. Doing a quick google search I can find things like this “Monsanto has 142 patent infringement suits against 410 farmers and 56 small businesses in more than 27 states. In total the firm has won more than $23m from its targets”. It seems to me that maybe you should spend less on patient lawyers/not get so cozy with our sleeze bag government officials (people only think of shady things when you get involved with our government). Spend more on informing the public, or hell just being a outstanding moral company.

    Reply

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